Stop! Sit! Go! Do! Eat! Don’t!

We were fortunate to have ‘Teacher Tom‘ at our school last weekend for an Early Years Conference. I  believe that everything we talked about that weekend applies to all ages. A topic that left a lasting impression on all of us was ‘The power of language.’

Imagine you spouse/partner/parent/child/friend commanding you : “Vacuum the carpet!” “Wash the dishes!” “Mow the lawn!” “Make dinner!” “Sit down.” “Eat your food now.” My reaction to that would be to turn around and walk away. You are not my boss! Stop commanding me.

Tom Hobson (aka ‘Teacher Tom’) told us that 80% of what we say to our students are commands. We are constantly directing them, “Do this. Now do that. Go there. Stop. Sit. Eat. Don’t.” etc. We say we want to raise responsible children that can think for themselves, but do we give them an opportunity to do so? It seems like we are always telling them what to do.

Here is something we can do to help us reflect on our own choice of language. Put four pieces of masking tape on your arm labeled “Directive” “Informative” “Questions” “Social Statements.” Throughout the teaching day, tally everything you say to the students.

Directive Statements: when you tell someone what to do.

Informative Statements: factual information (e.g. “It is Music class.” “John is sitting on the carpet.” “We all agreed to be kind to each other.” “We will use our Math notebooks today.”)

Questions: “What do you think?” “Where is your book?” “I wonder…?”

Social Statements:  e.g. How are you? Good morning! Thank you!

 

Reflect on what you are saying and how you are saying it. Can your directive statements be turned into informative statements?

Teacher Tom writes about the Language of Command  here.  It’s a good read.

One thought on “Stop! Sit! Go! Do! Eat! Don’t!

  1. Tony Robbins work delves deeply into the empowering vs disempowering language we use not only with others but also in the form of self-talk that we use with ourselves. So much truth to choosing words carefully as these words have a direct and immediate impact upon our emotional state and physiology.

    Great post Marina to remind educators about the power of our words. Thanks.

    Like

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